5 Considerations for Millennials & Generation Z Open to Franchising and Business Ownership

Franchising is not often considered by the approximately 139 million Millennials and Generation Z population (as of 2020). But, with so many qualified people looking to start or extend their careers, and on their own terms, every job option merits consideration.

First things first. Let’s understand who makes up this segment of the U.S. population that will make up the majority of the workforce for the next 30-40 years:

Millennials were the largest generation group in the U.S. in 2019, with an estimated population of 72.1 million. Born between 1981 and 1996, Millennials recently surpassed Baby Boomers as the biggest group, and they will continue to be a major part of the population for many years.

Generation Z is the most recent to have been named, and many group members will not be able to remember a time before smartphones and social media. However, the group already makes up around 20.35 percent of the U.S. population, and they are said to be the most racially and ethnically diverse of all the generation groups. 

The number of Baby Boomers, whose generation was defined by the boom in births following the Second World War, has fallen by nearly six million since 2010. However, they remain the second-largest generation group, and aging Boomers are contributing to steady increases in the median age of the population. Meanwhile, the Millennial and Gen Z generations continue to grow, and a big reason for this is the increasing number of young immigrants and refugees arriving in the United States.

Thanks to Adecco’s ‘Way to Work’ survey, which surveyed 1,001 Americans who are mostly currently in college or recently graduated and in their late teens to mid-20s, the primary differences between the two generations and how these differences might play out in the workplace have been identified. Three key takeaways, or differences between Millennials and Gen Z regarding work include:

  • Members of Gen Z are more concerned about the cost of education (21% of respondents), compared to Millennials (13% of respondents).
  • Millennials value stability (34%), while Gen Z puts more of an emphasis on finding their dream job (32%).
  • More Gen Zers follow their parents’ influence (42%), compared to their Millennial counterparts (36%).

So, what about business ownership and franchising, once the American Dream of Baby Boomers?

Here are five important considerations for Millennials and Gen Z open to this path of entrepreneurship:

Affordability. Most people between the ages of 18 and 35 cannot afford $800,000 for a brick-and-mortar business but a home-based business might cost between $40,000 and $60,000. There are a vast variety of franchises. Millennials and Gen Z can find one that fits their budget as well as their ideal income, lifestyle, wealth and equity.

Digital Minds. Both groups are digital natives who can capitalize on the Internet to grow their business. Every type of franchise can benefit from someone proficient in the cyber realm, whether that be growing an at-home business in pajamas, creating a digital work force or driving business with a creative social media campaign.  

Control. Some franchises have a web presence that is systemized from the top. If that’s the case, Millennial and Gen Z candidates need to decide if controlling the social presence is important to them or not, then choose a franchise accordingly.

Do Good. Many young people are as concerned their life work be meaningful and socially responsible as they are with money. A franchise allows Millennial and Gen Z candidates the opportunity to “do good” while being their own boss. Franchises exist for dog sitting, tutoring and healthy food, among countless options available for those looking align livelihood with their social mission. 

Difficulties. Both generations like their own voice on social media, their own marketing plan and are generally excited to execute their next big idea. Franchisors offer a replicable model so customers know what to expect. A Millennial or Gen Z candidates who decide to become a franchisee must be sure they completely support the system they choose.

21 Tips for Young and Aspiring Entrepreneurs

As the future of works rests on the shoulders of Millennials and Generation Z, changes to the work force will continue and most likely, not return to any semblance of what was common pre-pandemic. I guess the most important questions (concerns) for me are, Will Millennials and Gen Zers pull professional culture in opposite directions, or do both generations have common ambitions? After all, the workplace structure cannot be a work in progress forever.

Startup or Franchise? Focus on what is best for you but choose wisely.

Owning and operating a small business was once the exclusive domain of the risk takers of the business world. The true entrepreneur had a distinct flair for creativity, innovation and vision. He, and I emphasize “he”, knew how to operate outside-the-box. He knew how to make things happen. Many times, this individual had little choice as he knew from an early age, he would be responsible for shaping his future and for making it on his own. Formal education was usually limited and often just a far-fetched dream. Corporate life was not even an option. Besides, he couldn’t be told what to do, how to do it and when to do it. No way. No how.

Well, times certainly have changed in the business world. More so recently as many individuals are again faced with economic uncertainty. An advanced degree is no longer the fast track to success. As such, many individuals especially more women than ever before are deciding enough is enough. Wanting to control their own destiny they’re increasingly choosing small business ownership as opposed to leaving their future in the hands of Corporate America.

Sure, the financial aspects are vitally important. That’s a given. However, today’s new small business owners describe their number one priority as establishing true balance in all areas of their life. They desire the freedom of furthering their own personal growth but will limit that growth by their abilities and resources, finding it more important to help others improve the quality of their lives and build long-term mutually beneficial relationships; both business and personal. They firmly believe people and relationships to be the foundation of success even more than money itself as they have determined money (profits) will be the end result of their actions.

This is where the road gets tricky as a decision must be made between starting their own venture and assuming total risk or reducing the learning curve and limiting the risk by investing in a franchise where they would be in business for themselves but not by themselves. The key questions posed by many emerging small business owners are asked very emphatically, “Can I achieve my goals and objectives as part of a franchise system? And do I have what it takes to be a franchisee?”

In addressing these questions (and concerns), it’s relatively easy to analyze the two and realize, beyond the viability of a particular franchise brand as addressed in due diligence of the franchise concept itself, the answers are really contingent and dependent upon each other. The answers actually lie in understanding the mindset required to be a franchisee. Once understood, a choice must be made regarding the desired path either as an independent small business owner or as one of the hundreds of thousands of franchisees across several thousand franchise concepts worldwide.

The typical franchisee must be willing to follow and adhere to a franchise company’s business system and ultimately, promote the same within their new franchise community at all times. It must be completely understood the system cannot be changed by the franchisee nor can their business be operated differently than the franchise company requires as the system is proven and uniform across the chain. It’s this uniformity throughout the organization that is paramount to brand awareness leading to company and franchisee success and is the foundation of an interdependent relationship between both parties to the franchise agreement.

A franchise is almost definitely not the right choice for the business maverick or renegade. Certainly, there is an important place in business and in our hearts for these unique innovators. If not, we wouldn’t know Apple or Amazon as they’re known today. Even McDonalds, as probably the greatest franchise of all time that stormed through the country under the leadership and direction of a true maverick, Ray Kroc, would not have been successful without franchisees being required to strictly follow and adhere to the McDonalds system without fail. No questions asked and no room for negotiation.

Entrepreneurs will be around for centuries to come blazing trails as never before. Some will actually plan to choose franchising as an expansion strategy and build the foundation of future franchise concepts. They will provide a choice for tomorrow’s small business owners on whether to go it alone or invest in a franchise. And it will be those franchisees of tomorrow that will follow, promote and expand those systems that will prove to be the steel, bricks and glass built upon the foundation of new franchise companies. Thus, continuing the growth of franchising as it increasingly expands throughout the world, giving back by affording people more opportunities and options in determining the path to small business ownership that suits them best.

Fear And Consequences of Failure: A True Story Retold Once Again

I’ve been asked time and again to post the following article that I’ve written about in 2011 regarding my own personal experience as a multi-unit franchisee where I succeeded at first, only to crash and burn later on. Over the years, this article has been posted on several of my blogs, picked up by numerous other blogs & online publications, and discussed on various podcasts. I have received numerous comments and inquiries about the article and my experience as well as individuals sharing their own personal experiences and requests for assistance. Although I cringe at the thought of any business failing, I admire and respect the fact that franchisees and franchisors alike (small business owners and individuals & teams running larger organizations as well) know when to put their pride aside and ask for assistance, and I always look forward to providing my experience and expertise to help determine a practical resolve to their problems. 

I’m proud to say this article has been instrumental in helping a number of businesses keep their doors open and work towards recovery. On the other hand, I’m also sad to say several businesses were not as fortunate, but at least the owners were able to exit with dignity and in few cases, with less liability than they previously thought possible. And, in one case, the business owner actually exited in the black when we were able to facilitate the sale of her business when she previously thought about just walking away. Considering the difficulties many small business owners, restaurant operators, franchisees, entrepreneurs and organizations have experienced over the past two years and with challenges continuing, I’m sharing this article once again.

Fear and Consequences of Failure (unedited from 2011)

I can personally relate to the trials and tribulations of owning franchise businesses as I have “been there and done that” and have experiences on both ends of the spectrum from achieving overwhelming success to dealing with bitter failure. I have definitely come to understand the fine line between success and failure in trying to nail down the American Dream.

I know it is sometimes counterproductive to even mention failure which is why the subject is always avoided and never discussed. Yet, it’s out there and it’s real. Once franchisees face the possibility of failure and its very real consequences, they can be motivated to understand that failure is not an option and commit 100% to a plan that addresses immediate problems and provides solutions accordingly. Even if it’s necessary for the plan to be quite drastic or aggressive due to prevailing circumstances, franchisees that unequivocally realize that failure is not an option are prepared for immediate action.

Let me emphasize one point. Franchisees should not view poor sales and disappointing profits as either potential or immediate failure and stick their heads in the sand. I made that mistake in the past and suffered the consequences. Instead, franchisees should build upon the courage it took to become a franchise business owner and recommit to success as they did when they first took the entrepreneurial plunge.

They need to remember their wishes, hopes and dreams that prompted the decision to own their own business. They need to remember the admiration of family and friends when they heard about the new venture. They need to remember the excitement when they actually signed the franchise agreement.

Unfortunately, there’s a very distinct possibility the root of the problem is embedded in the franchisee’s actions, non-conformity to the franchise system and unwillingness to face reality. However, as there was some shining light evident during the franchise award process, it may not be a totally lost cause if the franchisee is made to completely understand the implications and consequences of failure.

As franchisors are faced with the potential of closed units [during this recession] that may be the result of things out of their control, it’s imperative they don’t lose even a single unit just because a franchisee just flat out needs a snap back to reality. It’s worth the effort.

Let me clarify something. I failed as a franchisee. Not because of anything the franchisor did or didn’t do but because I put and kept my head in the sand and did not face reality. I could go on and make excuses about things that happened around me but at the end of the day I could have turned things around if I got my own head out of the sand, made some difficult decisions and took full, immediate responsibility.

Unfortunately, I was scared of failing. I was afraid of what people would think. I was ashamed at what other franchisees, ones I put in business, would think of me. I couldn’t even think of facing my family. All lame excuses for not taking responsibility. Maybe a hard swift kick you-know-where would have helped.

Did I mention that I previously ran the franchise company where I failed as a franchisee? Did I mention I was elected by fellow franchisees, President of the National Advisory Council? Did I mention that I owned and operated five franchise units?

If I had clearly understood the implications and consequences that were looming on the horizon and if I was able to get my big ego out of the way and address things head on, maybe I could have survived. Maybe I could have at least implemented an exit strategy that would have, in some small way, paid back the loyalty and support of my employees, family and friends.

In the end, I may not have survived because it may very well have been too late when and if I finally took action and responsibility. But maybe I could have at least exited with some dignity. Also, I could have saved many innocent people a great deal of hardship, embarrassment, wasted effort and ill-spent resources if I did face reality. This includes my family, my employees and yes, my franchisor; all who believed in me.

Yes, it was a tremendous learning experience but not one I would bestow or wish on anyone. Now, all I can do is to offer my experience to anyone in the franchise industry that needs assistance. As we [prepare to enter 2012] in the realms of economic uncertainty, I’m certain already difficult situations have been compounded but I’m confident a snap back to reality could only help. If just one franchise business is saved from the consequences of failure, then we’ve made progress. Progress we’ll continue to build upon.

When Faced with Failure…

Sometimes regardless of how well entrepreneurs plan and despite how much effort they dedicate to something, they often fall short of their goals and the end-results cause a multitude of challenges and problems. Ultimately, it can adversely affect their financial position, reputation, relationships, team spirit and much more. It can also start to spiral into personal life and affect family, health and overall well-being. 

Unfortunately, such situations are often perpetuated by denial when placing one own’s head in the sand. 

Think of it this way… If we are to put our own head is in the sand, our most vulnerable ass-et would be sticking out in plain view. Some will laugh. Others will point and snicker, definitely telling others. And a few will take advantage of the situation and current position of vulnerability. 

“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” – Robert F. Kennedy

Sadly, many business owners put themselves in that position. Not because they swung and missed. Not because they didn’t see the forest for the trees. And not because they just flat-out saw something that wasn’t there. Instead, it’s because they didn’t keep their head high, accept the situation, learn from it and move on, and with laser-focus. That is exactly what true entrepreneurs do when faced with failure.

Why Embracing Failure is Key for Entrepreneurial Success

Starting a business is anything but easy. From raising the appropriate capital to arming yourself with the right resources, there are a lot of steps to take and a lot of places in which one wrong decision can threaten everything. And while a small fraction of new business launches go off without a hitch, most experience at least a few roadblocks along the way. After all, over 50% of small businesses fail in the first four years.

In many ways, entrepreneurship is as much about luck as it is about skill, and there’s not always a way to avoid failure. However, learning how to rise above failure and turn problems into possibilities can be the deciding factor between making things work and shutting down your business. This is why embracing failure is the key to entrepreneurial success.

Read more HERE.

Acceler8Success Cafe Small Business Weekly

Small Business Weekly

Are You an Entrepreneur? The Answer Might Surprise You! (credit: addicted2success.com)

They don’t wait to be told what to do, or for conditions to be perfect, or to be handed the resources they need on a platter. In the spirit of a famous slogan, they just go out and do it. End of story. Sounds simple, right? But it’s not an easy process by any means.

It’s this kind of spirit that sees success as inevitable after hundreds of failures, rejections and setbacks. It’s this kind of spirit that enables the entrepreneur to pick themselves up off the floor, dust themselves off, and start all over again, even where the outcome is uncertain. It’s this kind of spirit that can hold a dream in perfect suspension in the imagination, believing in it even in the face of all odds, until the day it’s there in solid reality.

And the best part? You don’t even have to be building your own business to have entrepreneurial spirit. You can be working to transform a business – someone else’s business, or even the ‘business’ of a non-profit, university or government. This is called being an intrepreneur.

Admittedly this can be extremely challenging. You often won’t have control over all the resources you need. However, don’t forget our definition! Entrepreneurs progress with determination towards their goals despite not having the resources under their control. That’s the entrepreneurial way.

Read more HERE.

4 Keys to Growing Yourself as an Entrepreneur (credit: startupmindset.com)

If you are considering the entrepreneurial journey, then you may have already weighed many of the pros and cons in taking on this new venture. From the financial aspect and its commitment, to the hours of hard work and personal time sacrificed, to finally the personnel and logistics that goes into a company, the entrepreneur’s path is not an easy one.

However, what’s the fun in taking the easy path in life all the time? Entrepreneurship is a challenge, one that can be daunting due to the weight of its expectations in the final result being a success for both yourself and the people you serve and employ. Regardless of all the scare tactics one can tell themselves when thinking of becoming an entrepreneur, there is so much more this journey offers than just a monetary benefit.

Becoming an entrepreneur is not just about the hard work you put into opening a business, but also about the personal growth one endures as well. The path of entrepreneurship is one that can test an individual in many ways, but ultimately, teaches invaluable life lessons that can’t be taught in a classroom or at a seminar.

Here are some examples where becoming an entrepreneur can grow a person in ways that one never thought possible, and why experience is so crucial in becoming a better leader and boss.

Read more HERE.

Ready or Not: My Experience Launching a Side Hustle in 121 Days (credit: success.com)

The handwritten check arrived in a plain envelope. I signed and deposited it right away. Normally I would have then shredded it. But not this one. I’m saving this one.

It’s from my friend Fred “Honey Pot” Williams, a 61-year-old gastroenterologist and beekeeper, and it’s the first revenue from a side hustle I started with another friend, the first check I’ve gotten since graduating college for producing anything other than words. It feels like the first check of the rest of my life.

That’s certainly an overstatement. But I’m excited to stretch out into something new and for conceiving, planning and executing the first product: an adventure I dreamed up called 50-50-50 in which Honey Pot, eight others and I hiked 50 miles, biked 50 miles and canoed 50 miles, all in one five-day weekend. The 50s were a hook to celebrate my 50th birthday and just happened to form a great marketing shtick for an adventure trip. 

I’ve had a thousand half-baked side hustle ideas; this is the first one I’ve allowed to cook until it was edible. The difference between all those half-baked ideas and this delicious one is simple: passion. I wanted, needed, had to try this one. 

Life’s too short to pursue things you don’t love. If you’ve got that idea—that challenging, exciting, can’t-get-it-out-of-your-head-idea—I urge you to stop thinking about it, stop daydreaming about it, and start doing it

Maybe you can learn from my journey. Here’s how it went.

Read more HERE.

Have a great week. Make it happen. Make it count!

Learn about Acceler8Success Group services & resources for current and aspiring entrepreneurs by visiting our website at Acceler8Success.com.

From the Great Resignation to the Next Entrepreneurial Boom!

The Great Resignation is already drastically reshaping the corporate landscape, but its impact could have repercussions far beyond big businesses.

new survey indicates that the sizable number of people who are considering leaving their jobs aren’t just looking for new ones with better benefits or salaries. Some see it as a chance to start their own companies – and the result could be a massive influx of entrepreneurs and start-ups.

Since mid-2021, Americans had filed paperwork to start 3.2 million businesses, according to the Census Bureau. That’s a 41% increase over the same time frame in 2020 (which saw the most applications since the Bureau began tracking them) – and a 61% increase over the same period in 2019.

There have been more than 6 million filings since the pandemic began.

Read the Entrepreneurial Boom Could Be Looming HERE.

The Ten Most Common Types of Entrepreneurship

While the basic principles of entrepreneurship are the same—planning, starting and operating a business—the distinct nuances and skills needed vary depending on the type of business you plan to start. Becoming an entrepreneur requires the ability to define these differences and pinpoint the unique elements that are needed.

Traditionally, entrepreneurship is categorized into four main types: small businesses, scalable startups, large companies and social entrepreneurs. These models cover the fundamentals of starting a business and focus more on the company itself, rather than the qualities of the entrepreneur.

“However, just as the world continues to change, so do businesses. This means new opportunities for risk-taking and innovative game changers to pave the way in diverse entrepreneurial ways.”

With this in mind, even though there are quite a few similarities when it comes to the challenges that all business owners will face, there are certain types of entrepreneurship defined by the skills, characteristics, and personality traits of the entrepreneur. At the end of the day, it is the way you choose to run your business that makes them differ from one another.

Read more about the various types of entrepreneurship HERE.

How To Switch From An Employee To An Entrepreneur Mindset

Being an entrepreneur is an exciting and rewarding undertaking and, if you’re motivated by the thought of being your own boss, don’t be put off by the changes you’ll need to make to become a success. Not having one boss can mean you now have many, when you’re answering to your customers, your bank manager and the large number of people who are going to be looking to you for answers.

Being an entrepreneur isn’t the same as being an employee – no matter how high up the career ladder you’ve climbed. But the freedom you get as an entrepreneur means that you can develop your business, and run your life, in the way you think is best.

Read more about making the transition from employee to entrepreneur easier HERE.

Check HERE for books about entrepreneurship.

Acceler8Success Group

To learn more about comprehensive services and resources for current and aspiring entrepreneurs, please visit Acceler8Success Group website HERE.

Visit Acceler8Success Daily at https://paper.li/Acceler8Success-Daily

Acceler8Success Cafe Friday 11.13.20

5 Ways to Help Your Small Business Survive During the Pandemic

Covid has been the ultimate disrupter to the global economy. Fortune 500 companies and small start-ups alike have felt the blow, but it’s the small businesses that have suffered the most.

Small businesses are the backbone of the U.S. economy. According to the World Economic Forum, small businesses are responsible for employing nearly half of the private sector workforce. However, during these volatile times where social distancing measures have been put in place and mandatory shut-downs have happened, many small businesses have not been able to survive.   

In September, Yelp released its latest Economic Impact Report revealing business closures across the U.S. are increasing as a result of Covid. According to Yelp data, permanent closures have reached 97,966, representing 60 percent of closed businesses that won’t be reopening. Read more.

Veteran Entrepreneurs and Small Business Owners Adapt and Overcome Unprecedented Challenges

“This year, military veteran entrepreneurs have seen their businesses shuttered or put on pause by the pandemic, faced supply chain issues, and have had to continuously adapt operations in response to changing realities on the ground. This year has also shown a spotlight on an issue that has persisted for too long: the systemic racism in our nation that creates barriers to entrepreneurship for entrepreneurs and small business owners that are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color. With that awareness, Bunker Labs is creating a space that helps entrepreneurs overcome challenges posed by the pandemic and systemic racism by providing the tools, resources, and inclusive community that facilitate growth,” said Bunker Labs CEO Blake Hogan. Read more.

Survey: Small business owners’ uncertainty increased in October

More small business owners throughout the country expressed feeling uncertain about their economic future in the month before the election, although general optimism remained steady, according to research by the National Federation of Independent Business.

The NFIB’s Uncertainty Index increased by six points to 98 in October, while the Optimism Index held at 104. 

“Leading up to the presidential election, small businesses continued to focus on stabilizing their businesses but were uncertain about the future economic conditions due to COVID-19 government regulations on all levels,” said Bill Dunkelberg, NFIB’s chief economist. “We see solid momentum going into the fourth quarter, and another good quarter could get the GDP back to its 2019 closing levels.” Read more.

If you wouldn’t think about building a house without blueprints, why would you consider building a business without blueprints? Like plans for a home, business blueprints should include each component necessary for long-term benefit. Franchise Foundry can help ensure you have the right blueprints specifically for you as you explore the American Dream of business ownership! Learn more.

Five Emerging Disruptive Technologies For Entrepreneurs To Observe

While there are endless articles highlighting the benefits of artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality and blockchain, there are other emerging technologies that are often neglected by entrepreneurs. These technologies have the potential to completely disrupt the aerospace, health and manufacturing sectors. In this article, will explore five potential breakthrough technologies and how I believe they will converge. Read more.

Election Results Frame Positive Future For Franchising

This 2020 election season has been one like no other. The months leading up to election day — and indeed the days following election day — have been both passionate and tumultuous. With the election now over, the future for franchising is predictable and promising. Read more.

Franchise Foundry represents a number of quick service restaurant (QSR) brands realizing year-over-year sales increases.- Low initial investment – Funding support- Site selection assistance- Small real estate footprint- Support & training- Multi-unit opportunities- Multi-brand opportunities. Learn more.

SBA Loans: What Is an SBA Loan?

When a small business owner needs financing, the first option to come to mind is usually a loan through the Small Business Administration (SBA). While many people are familiar with the term “SBA loan,” they often aren’t clear on what these loans are, or even how to get them. We’ve provided a general overview of the common SBA loan programs to help you decide which programs may fit your business needs best.

The SBA provides several small business financing options. The six most common loans offered by the SBA are 7(a) loans, 504 loans, CAPLines, export loans, microloans, and disaster loans. We have summarized the basic requirements, costs, terms, and application process for each of these SBA loans. Read more.

Small Business Administration (SBA) Loan

Benetrends has been securing SBA financing  for 35+ years and has one of the best loan approval success rates in the industry. With a large and expanding network of lenders, you will have choices when it comes to selecting a loan.  You’ll also have access to our dedicated staff – experts in loans for businesses – to ensure the fastest possible application processing, including a dedicated loan closer to assist with the closing process. Learn more.

Acceler8Success Cafe Veteran’s Day 11.11.20

On this Veteran’s Day let’s keep in mind the following quote by George Washington…

“The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional to how they perceive the Veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their nation.”

Veteran Entrepreneur Portal

The Veteran Entrepreneur Portal (VEP) is designed to save time with direct access to the resources necessary to guide every step of entrepreneurship. It also makes it easier for small businesses to access federal services, regardless of its source—and quickly connects Veteran entrepreneurs to relevant ‘best-practices’ and information. Learn more.

Entrepreneurship Center offers help as businesses adapt to the pandemic

After a spike in unemployment due to the pandemic, many businesses and entrepreneurs are still trying to catch up.

Kristin Gaspke, who leads WCC’s Entrepreneurship Center, said there’s help for new and existing businesses. Last month, Gaspke and the EC team hosted a four-week Zoom webinar titled “How to Start and Optimize Your Business.”

“99% of what we do in the Entrepreneurship Center for the WCC family is free. We offer all of our programs to everyone. If you look at the pictures on our website, I can tell you the story about each student in the center at that time and where they are now,” said Gaspke. “Today, some of them are still local business owners.” Read more.

The story of the Shop Small® Movement

Small Business Saturday continues to be an annual holiday shopping tradition — just one part of the larger Shop Small Movement that supports small businesses every day and everywhere. Because shopping at a family-owned framing spot or buying a handmade ring from your favorite online small business helps to promote more vibrant communities. Learn more.

Over the next two weeks leading up to #SmallBusinessSaturday we’ll be posting photos like the one below to continue to create awareness that franchises are small business just like Mom & Pop businesses on Any Street, USA. And, just like those independent business owners, franchise owners take entrepreneurial risk, invest their life savings, work long hours, give back to their local communities, compete with big box retailers and much more. Please help in this cause by sharing these posts across social media. #ShopSmall #ShopLocal #ShopFranchise

How Small Businesses Can Adapt to Changing Consumer Behavior

Small businesses have faced immense challenges as they’ve been fully or partially shut down during the coronavirus pandemic. According to U.S. Census data, nearly 80% of small businesses reported a moderate or large negative effect from COVID-19 as recently as of mid-August.

But after a difficult spring and early summer, during which time one in five businesses reported applying for and receiving loans from the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), the landscape is beginning to look up. Small businesses are increasingly reopening, with 86% reporting that they are either fully (52%) or partially (34%) open. Read more.

The Secret to Business Survival in Today’s Tough Market

As we were ringing in 2020, it’s safe to say that nearly no one could have imagined the novel year that was virtually at our doorsteps. Like a monsoon, Covid-19 arrived. And with it a plethora of changes to not only how we live and work, but how business is conducted.

Quarantines and lockdowns became a way of life, forcing companies to transform how they operate. Office staff, sales reps, and others who were considered non-essential workers began working from home. In person meetings and sales calls became a thing of the past, replaced by collaboration tools to boost the efficiency of virtual teams. Read more.

Accelerating Success for individuals and brands alike!